How carbon dating works

Libby calculated the half-life of carbon-14 as 5568, a figure now known as the Libby half-life.

Following a conference at the University of Cambridge in 1962, a more accurate figure of 5730 years was agreed upon and this figure is now known as the Cambridge half-life.

The amount of carbon-14 gradually decreases through radioactive beta decay with a half-life of 5,730 years.

So, scientists can estimate the age of the fossil by looking at the level of decay in its radioactive carbon.

In addition, there are trace amounts of the unstable isotope carbon-14 (14C) on Earth.

It’s important that we allow God’s written record of history, the Bible, to guide our thinking about the past—this includes our understanding of the age of the Earth/universe How many times have you heard something like, “This animal lived 50,000 years ago”, or “This person died 20,000 years ago’?

Have you ever wondered how the scientists knew the age of the bone?

Most people think that scientists can actually measure the ages of rocks, using a method called “radiometric” or “radioisotope” dating.

More often, rocks are “dated” by the fossils they contain, based on a pre-existing belief in evolution.

Leave a Reply