Teenage online dating

But, really, what can we expect from a dating app that focuses on appearance?

Another troubling aspect: Sometimes, these teen relationships take place entirely online—the couple might go out for months and then break up without ever actually meeting in person. How are we parents to know who our kids are connecting with online?

My budding romance depended on whether I heard the shrill ring of an old-fashioned land-line phone. The social lives of today’s teens don’t revolve around waiting for their phones to ring.

Teens are much more likely to connect with each other through some form of social media, whether it’s Twitter, Instagram or matchmaking apps such as Tinder and Hot Or Not.

“Safety has to be first and foremost,” she wrote in a 2013 post.

“Parents need to help their teens understand that all is not necessarily as it seems; they need to be extremely careful with what they share online.” Cover image courtesy of Flickr.

As with most parenting issues concerning teens, one of the best things we can do is to talk to our teens about the possible dangers of dating online, experts say.

Though teens think they know everything, they really can be naïve and trusting just when they need to be wary and skeptical.

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Online teen dating seems to be ready made for concern.

So it pays to be aware of the app world, even as it changes more quickly than we parents seem to be able to keep up with.

One example is Yellow, a newer app that turns Snapchat into a kind of Tinder, allowing users to swipe right on selfies of teens the user wants to be “friends” with, and then provides info to allow the two to connect on Snapchat.

Plus, there’s time to think about how to respond in the most perfect, witty way, which just doesn’t happen in that awkward moment when you’re trying to talk to a crush.

Still, my daughter says, talking and flirting online really isn’t the same as doing so in person.

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